Review: Tecsun PL-380 DSP Radio

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An old gang condenser which uses air as its dielectric medium

I love radio. I’ve wanted to be a Ham since I was a kid and ordered numerous resources, however due to cost constraints, nothing worthwhile happened. Later on, I took up electronics and assembled two of my own radios, the old ones -not the very old ones with valves, but the analogue pre-IC ones using transistors, coils and transformers and a polyester gang condensor for the tuner. I have older memories and remember my ex-army uncle from EME who had once given me a gang condenser with plates which used air as its dielectric medium but Iost touch after IC’s became standard and replaced discrete components. Even though I had a Sony ICF-F12S radio, my heart longed for something which used PLL tuning and had a DSP and digital tuning and storage. Continue reading Review: Tecsun PL-380 DSP Radio

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Extracting coconut milk

 

Back to the main post on the coconut tree

Whenever I think of coconut milk, my mouth waters. Although she is no more, three dishes prepared by mum come vividly to my mind and I can almost taste it in my mouth as I write. The first is a common breakfast dish of steamed/boiled sweet potato served with salted coconut milk sweetened with a bit of  jaggery. The other dish is peppered (black pepper) mutton stew with green pumpkin and coconut milk and of course the payasa or kheer made from padengi (green gram), coconut milk, clarified butter and dry fruit.
Continue reading Extracting coconut milk

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Using a banneton to bake bread

In my previous post on How to bake your own wholewheat bread, I have not told you the whole story of my my bread experiments. The goal was to get the loaf done right, and the only way to figure out where I was going wrong with sourdough was to go back to the basics and use easier instant yeast. Once the output confirmed that my techniques and timings were right, I went back to my struggle with sourdough. Continue reading Using a banneton to bake bread

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Home made whole wheat bread

This has to be one of my longest experiments ever, partly due to me getting the baking bug only in the winters. The first two were disastrous failures and the end product could have been the choice of weapon used by Cain to kill Abel. The first one, used -wait for it… Champagne yeast and placed in a pressure cooker which doubled as an oven. It was pretty cold too -around 2 deg C in Delhi and the bread never rose. If I had saved the baked bread it could have replaced a brick in my garden wall back home. Continue reading Home made whole wheat bread

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Review: Sony ICF-F12S Radio

If you were born in the seventies or early eighties in India, the sound of a radio -which was the only source of entertainment and news  then would bring on a wave of nostalgia and rekindle old memories. For me I have additional memories passed down from a generation before and radio is an inseparable part of me. I never became a HAM like I wanted to when I was younger, but my love for radios and electronics never ended. Continue reading Review: Sony ICF-F12S Radio

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Oiling a griddle using an onion

This is part of a post that was supposed to be covered along with another on oiling griddles. It may be familiar to some and unfamiliar to others. I wanted to include this to complement my other post. Mum used to use this method for oiling our flat cast iron dosa griddle called a flat tava in Hindi and Kaavoli in Tulu.  I prefer it to the silicon brushes and the onion can later be chopped up and added to another recipe. It also adds a pleasant flavor to the dosa.

Alternative tools for oiling a griddle are coconut coir, banana leaf stalk and a piece of cotton cloth wrapped around a stick … the goal being to get a thin film of oil on the griddle. Continue reading Oiling a griddle using an onion

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Drying/Dehydrating coconut

 

Back to the main post on the coconut tree

Coconuts when stored in their husk last for a long time, even after their water has dried out. A dried out coconut is called a gontu tarai (Tarai = coconut) in Tulu. A coconut in Kannada is called tenginakaai. However, from a bug out or survival point of view, you might suddenly find yourself in possession of more coconut than you might be able to use, or as a single person find your grated coconut going rancid pretty fast. Even if it frozen, it does lose part of its taste. Sometimes you might also need dried coconut for a particular recipe. Continue reading Drying/Dehydrating coconut

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